Your Persuasion Cheat Sheet: How to Convince the other Party

Your Persuasion Cheat Sheet: How to Convince the other Party

Your Persuasion Cheat Sheet: How to Convince the other Party 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 11

YOUR PERSUASION CHEAT SHEET: How To Convince The Other Party?
ethos, pathos, logos

Make no mistake about it. When it comes to persuasions, knowing exactly how to persuade the audience is a powerful skill. While none of us are mind-readers, Aristotle got it right by narrowing down the tools of being a convincing speaker to three things: Ethos, Pathos and Logos.

The trio are must-haves in any persuasion that aims to win over the audience. Think Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs and even Barack Obama – take a leaf out of their books. By incorporating ethos, the credibility of the persuader; pathos, the emotional connection to the audience, and logos, your logical argument, you’ll soon be charming your audience just like King, Jobs and Obama.

The Bottom

Line

So what exactly is ethos, pathos and logos and how exactly do you harness their effectiveness? You first need to establish your credibility as a speaker to your audience, and this is your ethos. It is easier to sway the audience to your viewpoints once they have your credentials in mind. This means gaining their respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic. It is not about how well qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Now that you have the audience’s attention, pandar to their emotions. This is pathos. Do your anecdotes evoke any emotional connection with your audience? Are your stories relatable? It helps to do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your anecdotes accordingly.

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument. This is logos. Take care, what may sound logical to you may not be true for your audience. In order to curb this, ensure your argument is backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant! If you have a follow-up action, it has to be not only feasible but within the budgetary standards of your audience as well.

Connecting

The Dots

An obvious answer would be to form long-term bonds with whoever you are negotiating with as this would more likely have areas where you can create value. The longer you negotiate with someone, the better your chances at creating a practice/pattern of value creation.

Another way would be to build your reputation so that word gets around that you are someone who negotiates cooperatively. This might make people more prone to negotiating with you.
Last but not least, an innovative way to turn a single negotiation into an iterative one would be to use the issues on the table to build follow-up negotiations. Instead of laying all the cards on the table at once, break them up into separate issues that can be negotiated separately. There will be too many factors to deal at once, so both parties would have to meet again to further discuss these issues and find a better win-win deal.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Gaining your audience’s respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic is not about how well-qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Quick Tip2

Do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your ancedots accordingly

Quick Tip3

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument or viewpoint, backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant.

Quick Tip4

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