Persuasion

Persuasion

Handling the Disbelieving Audience 
Asia Volume 6, Number 24

“Who told you that?”:  Handling the Disbelieving Audience
the first attempt

Imagine you’ve lucked out and have secured an obviously hostile and disagreeable audience. Instead of going into defence mode and reiterating your main points over again (you cannot convince others by justifying yourself), first try using humour to lighten the tension in the room. This would be your first attempt to disarm them.

However, this does not always work. It is then vital to work doubly hard to gain their trust and respect. This can be done by pausing for a minute and rethink your persuasion points before framing your basic principles and proposals into an area of agreement or at least an area of negotiation.

You also must have prepared, in anticipation, evidence to solidify your stance against their potential gripes. Be confident in challenging them and showing that they may have incomplete evidence, unlike you.

"I KNOW MORE THAN YOU,

OR NOTHING AT ALL"

Another kind of audience that persuaders encounter is the “know-it-all” audience. Not only is the audience skeptical of your pitch, but they believe they are experts in the topic you are presenting and therefore their skepticism is justified.

For audiences like these, you have to have very strong references to your real-life examples. Stay facts-based, and be careful not to exaggerate anything. Prepare a balanced argument – show that you have considered all sides of the case and weighed the procs and cons. Remember, stay rational when responding to their criticism as getting flustered depicts that you do not have your presentation down pat.

At the other end of the spectrum, there is the audience who is ill-informed and therefore are not comfortable with believing anything you say. First of all, find out what they do not know by asking them, and giving sound and rational answers. In this case, facts and references add weight to what you are saying.

CONFIDENCE

IS KEY

Solidify your stance by talking with confidence — this is extremely important. Research has shown that trust is more likely to be built upon a confident source, and common sense would tell you that we prefer receiving advice from someone who knows exactly what they are talking about, because confidence breeds expertise.

Nicholas Boothman, author of Convince Them in 90 Seconds or Less: Make Instant Connections that Pay Off in Business and in Life, sums it up for you in a simple formula — Heed your “ABCs”: Work on your attitude, your body language and your congruence.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

First attempt to disarm a hostile and disagreeable audience – try humour to lighten the tension.

Quick Tip2

For the “Know-it-all” audience, stay facts-based and be careful not to exaggerate anything, prepare a balanced argument and stay rational when responding to their criticism.

Quick Tip3

Solidify your stance by talking with confidence and heed your “ABC’s” (attitude, body language, congruence).

Quick Tip4

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How Not To Mess Up On Your Persuasions 
Asia Volume 6, Number 21

Ahead of the Curve: How Not To Mess Up On Your Persuasions
promise to prepare

As a presenter, the worst thing that you can do is wait until the eleventh hour to get down to creating your persuasions. You need time for two fundamental things: creating your persuasion and rehearsing it time and again. Do not wait until the last minute to create your persuasion; underdeveloped persuasions reflect underdeveloped ideas!

What is the point of having great ideas but is unable to articulate them effectively? By rehearsing, we do not mean creating elaborate cue cards to read off. Using PowerPoint? Memorize your slides to avoid the perpetual action of turning around! Using vision boards? Know where to point to when making an emphasis!

More often than not, these meetings took some time to set up. Do not waste your audience’s time, put serious preparation and effort into your persuasion, and you would gain the respect of your audience.

START

STRONG

What you want to avoid is losing your audience’s attention – the minute you stumble is the second your credibility as an influencer dwindles. This begins right when you open your mouth to introduce yourself. Think of your introduction as a firm handshake; be confident but not assertive.

A lot of people overdo the introduction and it is vital to remember that being yourself is more likely to win over the audience than trying to be someone you are not.

If you are not a funny person, instead of making a joke, start with an engaging statistic or fact related to your material. An anecdote often helps the audience remember the point of your persuasion as well.

VISUAL AIDS -

MIX IT UP

Talking about the inventory report? Is your audience familiar with the jargon you are using? Visual aids are there to make up what is lost through your verbiage. Visual aids make or break your persuasion, but be wary of content overload. You do not want the audience to lose focus from the main message.

Overwhelm your audience with how great your ideas are, not with information overload. Depending on the material and forum, use a variety of props. PowerPoint slides are neither the end-all nor be-all of persuasions, use a whiteboard, flipchart and other physical objects to communicate your message.

Newer presentation software such as Prezi are alternatives to PowerPoint as well. A common mistake repeated by persuaders is that they often forget the rule of quality, not quantity. A 20-minute persuasion may not necessarily need five different types of visual aids.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Don’t wait until the last minute to create your persuasion; underdeveloped persuasions reflect underdeveloped ideas!

Quick Tip2

If you are not a funny person, instead of making a joke, start with an engaging statistic or fact related to your material. An anecdote often helps the audience remember the point of your persuasion as well.

Quick Tip3

Overwhelm your audience with how great your ideas are, not with information overload.

Quick Tip4

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Crunch Time: How To Persuade One-to-One Confidently 
Asia Volume 6, Number 19

Crunch Time: How To Persuade One-to-One Confidently
personalization & customization

Persuading one-to-one is a bridge most people would have to cross sooner or later. Before you begin, you will need to do an analysis of the needs and goals of the person you are persuading. There is no cookie-cutter analysis for every person, and this has to be done differently for different people.

Ask yourself these key questions. Why are you engaging personally to this person in the first place? What is their focus? What are their interests? What makes them tick? While a questionnaire may seem over the top, it is a useful tool to use before you plan your pitch. Moreover, keep in mind that sometimes people do not know what their needs are so it would be difficult to articulate them to you. This is where you can decide on specific outcomes for your engagement depending on the person. Effective one-to-one persuasion does not focus on just content; a plus point of one-to-one persuasion is that it is easier to do follow-ups after.

DO A

DEMO

The beauty of engaging with a single person is that it makes doing demonstrations less stressful. You only have one set of beady eyes watching your every move. On a more serious note, demos are important especially during one-to-one persuasions. Not only are you giving the person a chance to be more interactive, but gives you the chance to directly address any doubts they may have from your demo.

More effective than any verbal description, demos are tangible evidence that your product solves the problem posed. Be careful not to blabber on about the features; it is easy to fall into a conversational mood when talking to just one person. When it comes to demos, focus on the primary messages and keep the secondary ones at length. This means giving narrow descriptions instead of vague ones, and allowing room for the person you are engaging to ask questions.

IT'S ALL

ABOUT THE SPECIFICS

Explain what you are doing as soon as possible, advisably in your introduction to the person. There is no need for him or her to sit through a preamble. While you do not want your persuasion to turn into a casual conversation, any unnecessary formalities will make you seem less approachable. You want to keep a light-hearted yet professional mood.

The thing with one-to-one persuasions is that it allows any sharing of data take less than half the time it does with a larger audience. You know exactly which numbers your person is interested in and this allows you to cut straight to the chase. Do not waste this chance by simply glazing over the numbers. Again, milk the interaction aspect of one-to-one persuasions as much as you can and allow the person to ask questions.

The restaurant consultant Jim Sullivan has a neat trick as well when it comes to trying to convince a person. This involves reciting a list of options, but inclining your head slightly when you reach the choice you would like the person to make. According to Sullivan, use no more than five things on the list and it would be successful 60% of the time. The thing with body language is that it is amplified when just with one person, so use that to your advantage.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Effective one-to-one persuasions does not focus on just content; a plus point of one-to-one persuasions is that it is easier to do follow-ups after.

Quick Tip2

When it comes to demos, focus on the primary messages and keep the secondary ones at length. This means giving narrow descriptions instead of vague ones, and allowing room for the person you are engaging to ask questions.

Quick Tip3

While you do not want your persuasion to turn into a casual conversation, any unnecessary formalities will make you seem less approachable. You want to keep a light-hearted yet professional mood.

Quick Tip4

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Back to Basics: How to persuade without PowerPoint 
Asia Volume 6, Number 17

Back to Basics: How to persuade without PowerPoint
let’s get personal

With the advent of PowerPoint, many have resorted to using the software that has gradually diluted our ability to persuade without “slides” and “bullet points”. Yet, when technology fails (as it is apt to do), how many of us can actually rise to the occasion and persuade without PowerPoint?

The top three things you can do to sustain the attention of your audience without the use of PowerPoint are:
1. Using diagrams and charts – not complex and busy-looking diagrams; they should be clarifying concepts for your audience,
2. Using real-life and personal anecdotes as examples – everyone loves a good story,
3. Interact with your audience by peppering your persuasion with questions posed not only to find out what their concerns are, but to keep their mind jogging as your persuasion goes on.

MAKE IT EXPLICIT -

JUST THIS ONCE

Since you do not have the benefits of a slide that stays up to remind the audience of your points, be plain in your speech and deliver your words at a pace that can be absorbed by the audience. This also means avoiding technical jargon that they might not understand, and striving to be more descriptive in your language.

Now that they know what you are saying, does it make sense to them? Completely spell out any process step by step; and if you have a chart or diagram as a visual aid, that would be handy. Leave no room for misinterpretation; the audience has to be able to see the connections between your conclusions of your arguments.

POINT OUT

YOUR OPPOSITION

Your audience is not going to accept all your points as irrefutable, but by bringing up your opposing points, you are giving them leverage to believe you are a balanced speaker. Moreover, you capture their attention by suddenly going the other way in your persuasion. The audience is not a group of simple-minded folks; predictability is often the death of most persuasions.

Taking the other direction is a refreshing change in a persuasion. Not only are you bringing new perspectives to the table, you are revealing that there is more to your argument and this will make the audience sit-up and pay attention.

Moreover, make your argument more real by using real-life case studies as examples, and feel free to use any props or photographs as you see fit. Your ideas and theories only hold weight when the audience can see proof of it working in the real world.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Top 3 things you can do to sustain your audience’s attention are:

1) Using diagrams and simplified charts,

2) Using real-life and personal anecdotes as examples, and

3) interact with your audience by peppering your persuasion with questions.

Quick Tip2

Be plain in your speech, deliver your words at a pace that can be absorbed by the audience and completely spell out any process step-by-step (using chart or diagrams as visual aid).

Quick Tip3

Bringing up your opposing points is a refreshing change in a persuasion as not only are you bringing new perspectives to the table, you are revealing that there is more to your argument.

Quick Tip4

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Fail to Plan, Plan to Fail: How to fail in persuading your viewpoint 
Asia Volume 6, Number 3

Fail to Plan, Plan to Fail: How to fail in persuading your viewpoint
don’t build your position

Having a point of view beforehand means that you start off on a strong foot. If you have an unshakeable point of view, you would be able to confidently build your position from there. People are usually resistant to the unfamiliar, and your goal is to change this attitude without being competitive in your approach.

To be successful in presenting your viewpoint, you need to first clearly explain why you think the way you do, and invite responses from your audience. This demeanor makes them feel more valuable and gives them reason to help you make your idea possible. If you want to fail in persuading your viewpoint, do not build your position, and certainly show that you are as fickle-minded as possible.

DON'T

ENGAGE

By all means, don’t engage with your audience! Don’t ask them analytical questions about their point of view and certainly don’t show them how your views and ideas overcome their weak points. You will “surely” win them over with your viewpoint by doing so.

Questioning your audience is a no-no; you should not be making them active participants in the discussion. You are giving them authority to come to a resolution themselves and make them feel as though your ideas were theirs in the first place.

Also, if using charts and diagrams, do not gradually show the audience parts of it at a time. Instead, bombard them with visuals and give them the big picture from the get go. An audience loves nothing more than convolution and confusion stemming from an elaborate chart.

MAKE AS MUCH ASSUMPTIONS

AS YOU CAN

Last but not least, make as many assumptions as you can about not only what your audience likes, but that they know everything that you are talking about. Do not bother to clearly explain the processes because they are bound to know already, and will continue listening to you as they will not feel frustrated.

It is unnecessary to spend time getting to know potential investors and what motivates them in their business as well as their business as well as their compensations. Surely you can come up with answers to these yourself!

Failing to persuade your viewpoint is a no-brainer. Rather, successfully driving home your viewpoints takes a lot of dedication and preparation and requires the exact opposite of the steps stated above.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

People are usually resistant to the unfamiliar, and your goal is to change this attitude without being competitive in your approach.

Quick Tip2

If you want to fail in persuading your viewpoint, do not build your position, and certainly show that you are as fickle-minded as possible.

Quick Tip3

Successfully driving home your viewpoints takes a lot of dedication and preparation, and requires the exact opposite of the steps stated.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our workshops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

“All the World’s a Stage, So Engage”: How to prepare your pitch 
Asia Volume 6, Number 3

“All the World’s a Stage, So Engage”: How to prepare your pitch
less is more

When preparing your pitch, keep it snappy. It is likely that your audience is time-strapped so anticipate that yours is going to be a lengthy one, you have lost them with the first sentence. For matters like this, it is a quality versus quantity proposition.

Guy Kawasaki, an inventor, business advisor as well as one of the Apple employees responsible for marketing the Mac when it first came out, has a 10-20-30 rule: that is putting your PowerPoint (if you are using one) in a condensed format that is less likely to run over the time limit. Put simply, this means 10 slides in 20 minutes in 30 point large font. Kawasaki also emphasizes that if your pitch does not seem to attract your audience by the fifth slide, it’s a wrap.

PUTTING THINGS

INTO CONTEXT

Practice makes perfect could not be more true, except now you have to practice more than one variation of your pitch. Anyone can present a templated pitch, but it takes more effort and time to take a focused approach. Your audience will thank you for doing your homework and focusing your pitch to their interests and needs.

You must remember that even though you have the most interesting pitch, there are many other entrepreneurs who seek the spotlight as well. An effective way to edge out the competition is having a marketing strategy, and this comes from knowing your numbers and being prepared to give them out at any given moment.

Know your revenue, profit and projections – these are what all capitalists are interested in no matter what their focus. Moreover, it raises your credibility as a presenter. For the rest of your pitch, contextualize it to attract attention.

LEARN FROM EXAMPLE

AND ANTICIPATE

US Television network ABC’s new show Shark Tank features potential entrepreneurs who pitch to a group of experts who have made names for themselves in the working world. Take note of the pitchers’ flaws, as well as the questions posed to them by the experts. This is how you could anticipate and be ready for your own pitch. You do not want to be thrown off your game.

If presenting with a team, ensure that everyone is informed not only of their part, but of everyone else’s parts as well. Also, write down any hiccups and questions that might occur during your pitch and have a solution ready for each. Finally, visualize yourself giving the pitch to turn your confidence up a notch – as they say, “fake it till you make it!”.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

The 10-20-30 PowerPoint rule. This means 10 slides in 20 minutes in 30 point large font.

Quick Tip2

An effective way to edge out the competition is having a marketing strategy, and this comes from knowing your numbers and being prepared to give them out at any given moment.

Quick Tip3

Write down any hiccups and questions that might occur during your pitch and have a solution ready for each.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our workshops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

Make Your Message Matter: How The Audience Remembers Your Pitch 
Asia Volume 6, Number 3

Make Your Message Matter: How The Audience Remembers Your Pitch
keying in

A pitch without a key message is like a ship without a rudder. Why have key messages in the first place? Besides providing clarity and focus, they act as a bridge between you and the audience who are not as well-equipped as you in understanding the technical terms and jargon.

Key messages keep everyone on the same page, and this is essential when you could be one in a stream of people presenting your pitch. The easiest way to stand out is to be the easiest one to remember. Have your information in bite-sized chunks and in active voice: You want to do this and doing that addresses this and so on.

The aim of key messages is to make even the most casual of reviewers on track with your plans, so remember to focus on your key messages, using bold fonts and bullets as well as the necessary graphics to make them stand out.

IDENTIFY NO MORE THAN

FOUR KEY MESSAGES

If you are having difficulty narrowing down your presentation or pitch points to four main ideas, always start by asking yourself – What do I want my audience to take away with them after this presentation? You also need to know that each target audience is unique, and you might have to change the verbiage of your key messages in order to connect and cater to your target audience.

You want to garner support from your audience for your pitch. This means that if they ware a group of executives, keep the verbiage of your four key points professional and future-oriented, as well as relevant to their work.

It might be helpful to remember the 4-8-28 rule when formulating your key points: 4 messages, 8 seconds for each, 28 words in total (average of seven words per key message). While not a hard and fast rule, it is a model to be working towards to ensure that your audience gets only the meat of the message.

WHEN 10 AND 20

ARE MORE THAN 100

Research has shown that people retain only 10% of what they read for any length of time and 20% of what they learn from audio-visual. A good rule of thumb is to ask a member of the audience perhaps a week later if they can remember any four points from your presentation. You have done a good job if they remember the points you were conveying! You may be emphasizing the wrong points if they fail to recount what you planned as your key messages, and give other points instead.

How do you ensure that they remember the essential 20%? You can’t, but you can make it easier for them to retain.

Imagine that with only a minute, you had to convey the entire essence of your pitch. Present this condensed version at the end or at the beginning of he pitch, when your audience’s attention is at its fullest, and make sure you have those bolded bite-sized key points in your proposal for them to read.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Besides providing clarity and focus, key messages act as a bridge between you and the audience who are not as well-equipped as you in understanding the technical terms and jargon.

Quick Tip2

Remember the 4-8-28 rule when formulating your key points: 4 messages, 8 seconds for each, 28 words in total (average of seven words per key message).

Quick Tip3

Imagine that with only a minute, you had to convey the entire essence of your pitch. Present this condensed version at the end or at the beginning of the pitch, when your audience’s attention is at its fullest.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our workshops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

Different Audience, Same Message: Why care about your target audience? 
Asia Volume 6, Number 1

Different Audience, Same Message: Why care about your target audience?
for all

It is critical to realise that every audience is different, and a point well-received by one audience may not be true for another. Ultimately, you desire every audience to react positively to your pitch, and this is going to take some research on your part to learn what their main focus and needs are.

While there are customized things to be done for each audience, there are general rules that are applicable for any type of audience as well. The most important is to keep a positive tone on your message, and to turn every negative outlook into positive. Just like political candidates, if posed with opposition, always acknowledge the difference and then give your answer.

Confidence is a versatile skill to be used in all audiences as well. It is a proven fact that people tend to associate confidence with expertise, so communicate your confidence to the audience an they will be confident in your pitch as well. This is translated through your body language as well – people need to see you being confident just as much as hearing the confidence in your voice.

FOR

EACH

How do you go about adapting your message for each audience? Sounds like a tall order, and it is. Your preparation begins long before you enter that conference room. An obvious way to find out the demographics of your audience is to utilise your social media tools as well as through your connections and networks.

Your goal is always to find the focus of each audience and tailor your pitch to suit their focus. Speaking to a corporate group? Focus your message on the economics of your pitch. Speaking to a school board? Their focus would obviously be students and education.

Framing your argument for each different audience means using different images and words to conjure scenarios in your audience’s mind. It may seem that your pitch would then need to undergo constant revamp, and this is true only to the part where you want to move your audience to action. You need not change the facts and statistics of your presentation; rather, change the triggers that were intended to persuade your audience.

FOR

NONE

Obviously, when you structure your presentation with compelling introduction, body and conclusion, it would inspire your audience. Be sloppy about it and you convince no one. Do not have repeated examples in any of your points, and stay away from using complicated technical jargon. The best presentations have the audience walking away understanding what you have just said, and not leaving them confused and in doubt.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Keep a positive tone in your message, and turn every negative outlook into positive.

Quick Tip2

It is a proven fact that people tend to associate confidence with expertise, so communicate your confidence to the audience and they will be confident in your pitch as well.

Quick Tip3

Your goal is always to find the focus of each audience and tailor your pitch to suit their focus.

Quick Tip4

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One Size Fits All: Tips to Attract and Create Interest to your Pitch 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 7

ONE SIZE FITS ALL: Tips To Create And Attract Interest To Your Pitch
dress to impress

It should go without saying that within the first 20 seconds of meeting a person for the first time, an impression is formed merely from your attire. The next 20 seconds would be based on your body language. In total, 40 seconds does not give you much room to spew out content, does it?

As the pitch presenter, you have to look better than everyone else in the room as you are the person with something to prove. Add a little quirk to your attire only if necessary to your pitch – it may work in your favour as the visual presentation of yourself might help your audience connect the image of you to your product.

For most entrepreneurs, especially young ones, selling an idea is tough enough as it is. Dressing like a leader gives you complete control over one aspect of your pitch, and helps you start off on the right foot.

Customize, Customize..

And Show Examples

A pitch quickly falls flat when a presenter fails to understand their target audience, and this has little to do with knowing their product than knowing who they are presenting to. Your cookie-cutter, templated pitch is fine to use when you are rehearsing your pitch.

However, more thought has to put into finding out the unique needs, financial and budgetary requirements, and unique systems and processes that each audience possesses. At the end of the day, you may have put on a brilliant pitch but if the audience walks away wondering what any of it has got to do with them, you have failed.

One way to counteract this obstacle should be a no-brainer research! Ask questions and do your research before walking into that conference room, and have examples that match the needs of your clients. Real life examples have more impact than hypothetical ones — this should be a no-brainer as well.

Your Vision

Their Mission

A vision and a mission are two different things, contrary to popular belief. While visions anticipate the future and creates goals accordingly, missions are duties or tasks that are assigned to a particular group that correlates with their goal or purpose. Simply put, if visions are the blueprints, missions are the action plans.

In order to connect our audience with your vision, ask them questions and take notes on their answers. What do they need? What would they like to see done in the future? While you may not be necessarily able to address ther issue on the spot, follow-up with them after the presentation or pitch. By asking questions, you are creating an avenue for them to continue communication with you after you have done your pitch.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

As the pitch presenter, you have to look better than everyone else in the room as you are the person with something to prove.

Quick Tip2

Ask questions and do your research before walking into that conference room, and have examples that match the needs of your clients.

Quick Tip3

In order to connect your audience with your vision, ask them questions and take notes on their answers.

Quick Tip4

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What would Steve Jobs do? Ideas to Speak with Clarity 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 9

WHAT WOULD STEVE JOBS DO? Ideas To Speak With Clarity
the man behind the product

Ever sat in a presentation by Steve Jobs? To the untrained eye, Job’s public presentations seem simple and spontaneous. However, behind all that are weeks and weeks of preparation. From sound checks to demos to selecting material, the Apple team ensures the show runs smoothly. Clarity is not all about explaining and talking clearly, but a whole process to make your audience feel as if they were the ones who pitched the idea.

Clarity is a whole package that requires intense practice and complete knowledge of your product. Jobs was a perfectionist when it comes to unveiling his company’s new products, despite Apple garnering roughly the same amount of annual sales as Nike. Precision and clarity were the main goals of his presentations. Jobs elaborate sales pitch comes across as effortless execution on the day instead because of all the effort put in beforehand. If Jobs prepared weeks for his pitch, what’s your excuse?

Mind

Your Language

Language forms the fundamental part of your presentation, and you have to be sure that what you say is what you mean. Not only does the right language indicate your level of education, but it also gives the impression of a cultured mind. However, be wary that there is a difference between sounding smart and sounding like a snob, the latter which would turn the audience away.
Besides the usual rules of shunning verbal pauses and fillers, slangs and unknown technical jargon, in order to speak with clarity, you need to avoid double negatives in your speech and improve your vocabulary — done simply by reading more.

Bumping up your vocabulary allows you to clearly articulate your subject, and you need to show the audience that you are an expert in your subject. This means knowing your subject inside-out as well, no excuses. Moreover, do not neglect your grammar. Sitting in on a presentation with bad grammar is like trying to read a novel with a hyperactive kid running around — you try to concentrate but the distraction becomes too blatant and overwhelming to understand or enjoy the presentation.

Behind Simplicity

Is Complexity

Confusion usually arises due to one of two things: beating around the bush of your point, or saying too much that does not need to be said. In both cases, your audience is going to quite listening and shut down. If you have a complicated process to explain, add gist and simplicity to your explanation. Adding even more complexity is going to confound your audience even more.

You will then need to know what it means to sound articulate and educated — the two do not necessarily go hand in hand. Using flowery language and big words show that you are educated, but this does not mean your audience would understand you — that is solved by being articulate.

It works when trying to persuade as well. The trouble with persuasion is that it sometimes is overdone on the presenter’s part, but the best way to persuade is through clarity. As Dr. Flint McGlaughlin from Marketing Experiments often propounds, “Clarity trumps persuasion.” What better way to win people over than by making them understand exactly what you are talking about? Be consistent with your message, use plain terms and clarify, clarify, clarify the doubts of your audience.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Clarity is not all about explaining and talking clearly, but a whole process to make your audience feel as it they were the ones who pitched the idea.

Quick Tip2

Sitting in a presentation with bad grammar is like trying to real a novel with a hyperactive kid running around — you try to concentrate but the distraction becomes too blatant and overwhelming to understand or enjoy the presentation.

Quick Tip3

Be consistent with your message, use plain terms and clarify, clarify, clarify the doubts of your audience.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our work- shops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

Your Persuasion Cheat Sheet: How to Convince the other Party 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 11

YOUR PERSUASION CHEAT SHEET: How To Convince The Other Party?
ethos, pathos, logos

Make no mistake about it. When it comes to persuasions, knowing exactly how to persuade the audience is a powerful skill. While none of us are mind-readers, Aristotle got it right by narrowing down the tools of being a convincing speaker to three things: Ethos, Pathos and Logos.

The trio are must-haves in any persuasion that aims to win over the audience. Think Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs and even Barack Obama – take a leaf out of their books. By incorporating ethos, the credibility of the persuader; pathos, the emotional connection to the audience, and logos, your logical argument, you’ll soon be charming your audience just like King, Jobs and Obama.

The Bottom

Line

So what exactly is ethos, pathos and logos and how exactly do you harness their effectiveness? You first need to establish your credibility as a speaker to your audience, and this is your ethos. It is easier to sway the audience to your viewpoints once they have your credentials in mind. This means gaining their respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic. It is not about how well qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Now that you have the audience’s attention, pandar to their emotions. This is pathos. Do your anecdotes evoke any emotional connection with your audience? Are your stories relatable? It helps to do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your anecdotes accordingly.

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument. This is logos. Take care, what may sound logical to you may not be true for your audience. In order to curb this, ensure your argument is backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant! If you have a follow-up action, it has to be not only feasible but within the budgetary standards of your audience as well.

Connecting

The Dots

An obvious answer would be to form long-term bonds with whoever you are negotiating with as this would more likely have areas where you can create value. The longer you negotiate with someone, the better your chances at creating a practice/pattern of value creation.

Another way would be to build your reputation so that word gets around that you are someone who negotiates cooperatively. This might make people more prone to negotiating with you.
Last but not least, an innovative way to turn a single negotiation into an iterative one would be to use the issues on the table to build follow-up negotiations. Instead of laying all the cards on the table at once, break them up into separate issues that can be negotiated separately. There will be too many factors to deal at once, so both parties would have to meet again to further discuss these issues and find a better win-win deal.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

Gaining your audience’s respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic is not about how well-qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Quick Tip2

Do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your ancedots accordingly

Quick Tip3

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument or viewpoint, backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant.

Quick Tip4

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Technology can be Archaic: Why you must never use PowerPoint 
Spring 2016, Asia Volume 6, Number 13

TECHNOLOGY CAN BE ARCHAIC:
Why You Must Never Use PowerPoint
Tried and Tested

Let’s face it. Ever since the invention of PowerPoint, it has become default for many presenters to utilize it. In fact, it has become refreshing not to walk into a presentation that uses PowerPoint! Take Gary Vaynerchuck for example. At an INBOUND marketing conference in 2012, the self-made entrepreneur captivated the audience in a 45-minute presentation that not once used a single PowerPoint slide and earned himself a standing ovation.

If that is not reason enough, a recent survey done by SlideRocket (an alternative to PowerPoint) indicated that at least one out of four would rather forego sex that sit through a presentation. Almost a fifth of the thousand adults polled would rather work on a Saturday. PowerPoint is used not only by entrepreneurs, but teachers as well. An estimated 30 million PowerPoint presentations are made daily, with more than 500 million users worldwide.

With all that in mind, is it any wonder why PowerPoint has become a tried and tested presentation tool?

Pointless?

We think so too

Granted, PowerPoint adds structure to your presentation. But therein lies a problem as well. Presenters get carried away with putting too many bullet points and adding pointless graphics. There are more ways to spice up your presentation, and there is a difference between interesting and distracting graphics.

Be mindful of keeping a balance between the amount of words and visuals. However, while it is helpful having bullet points for all to flow with your verbiage, emphasis is only effective when people hear what you are saying and understand its importance. And most of the time, people fall into the trap of using graphics that do not help the audience retain your message.

Too many

Says too little

Yet another reason why you should not always use PowerPoint is the danger of information overload. By now, you should know that simplicity is key to getting through to your audience — they want only the meat of your message. There is no right amount of slides to use for your presentation thus many run wild with not only the amount of slides but the information on them.

With too many slides come too many words. You will leave your audience struggling to read what is on your slide, and this takes the attention away from what you are saying. Your slides are not there to tell the audience your story; you are the one giving the message and the slides are merely to reinforce what you are saying. Your presentation will start going downhill once the audience stops listening to you. It is advisable instead to allow a few seconds for the audience to take in what is on your slide before resuming your speech.

At the end of the day, PowerPoint is only powerful if done right, and how many can confidently say that they can do that?

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More
Quick Tip1

While it is helpful having bullet points for all to follow with your verbiage, emphasis is only effective when people hear what you are saying and understand its importance.

Quick Tip2

Yet another reason why you should not always use PowerPoint is the danger of information overload. By now, you should know that simplicity is key to getting through to your audiencYour slides are not there to tell the audience your story; you are the one giving the message and the slides are merely to reinforce what you are saying.
e.

Quick Tip3

Your slides are not there to tell the audience your story; you are the one giving the message and the slides are merely to reinforce what you are saying.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our workshops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!