Persuasion

Persuasion

One Size Fits All: Tips to Attract and Create Interest to your Pitch 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 7

ONE SIZE FITS ALL: Tips To Create And Attract Interest To Your Pitch
dress to impress

It should go without saying that within the first 20 seconds of meeting a person for the first time, an impression is formed merely from your attire. The next 20 seconds would be based on your body language. In total, 40 seconds does not give you much room to spew out content, does it?

As the pitch presenter, you have to look better than everyone else in the room as you are the person with something to prove. Add a little quirk to your attire only if necessary to your pitch – it may work in your favour as the visual presentation of yourself might help your audience connect the image of you to your product.

For most entrepreneurs, especially young ones, selling an idea is tough enough as it is. Dressing like a leader gives you complete control over one aspect of your pitch, and helps you start off on the right foot.

Customize, Customize..

And Show Examples

A pitch quickly falls flat when a presenter fails to understand their target audience, and this has little to do with knowing their product than knowing who they are presenting to. Your cookie-cutter, templated pitch is fine to use when you are rehearsing your pitch.

However, more thought has to put into finding out the unique needs, financial and budgetary requirements, and unique systems and processes that each audience possesses. At the end of the day, you may have put on a brilliant pitch but if the audience walks away wondering what any of it has got to do with them, you have failed.

One way to counteract this obstacle should be a no-brainer research! Ask questions and do your research before walking into that conference room, and have examples that match the needs of your clients. Real life examples have more impact than hypothetical ones — this should be a no-brainer as well.

Your Vision

Their Mission

A vision and a mission are two different things, contrary to popular belief. While visions anticipate the future and creates goals accordingly, missions are duties or tasks that are assigned to a particular group that correlates with their goal or purpose. Simply put, if visions are the blueprints, missions are the action plans.

In order to connect our audience with your vision, ask them questions and take notes on their answers. What do they need? What would they like to see done in the future? While you may not be necessarily able to address ther issue on the spot, follow-up with them after the presentation or pitch. By asking questions, you are creating an avenue for them to continue communication with you after you have done your pitch.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More

Quick Tip1

As the pitch presenter, you have to look better than everyone else in the room as you are the person with something to prove.

Quick Tip2

Ask questions and do your research before walking into that conference room, and have examples that match the needs of your clients.

Quick Tip3

In order to connect your audience with your vision, ask them questions and take notes on their answers.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our work- shops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

What would Steve Jobs do? Ideas to Speak with Clarity 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 9

WHAT WOULD STEVE JOBS DO? Ideas To Speak With Clarity
the man behind the product

Ever sat in a presentation by Steve Jobs? To the untrained eye, Job’s public presentations seem simple and spontaneous. However, behind all that are weeks and weeks of preparation. From sound checks to demos to selecting material, the Apple team ensures the show runs smoothly. Clarity is not all about explaining and talking clearly, but a whole process to make your audience feel as if they were the ones who pitched the idea.

Clarity is a whole package that requires intense practice and complete knowledge of your product. Jobs was a perfectionist when it comes to unveiling his company’s new products, despite Apple garnering roughly the same amount of annual sales as Nike. Precision and clarity were the main goals of his presentations. Jobs elaborate sales pitch comes across as effortless execution on the day instead because of all the effort put in beforehand. If Jobs prepared weeks for his pitch, what’s your excuse?

Mind

Your Language

Language forms the fundamental part of your presentation, and you have to be sure that what you say is what you mean. Not only does the right language indicate your level of education, but it also gives the impression of a cultured mind. However, be wary that there is a difference between sounding smart and sounding like a snob, the latter which would turn the audience away.
Besides the usual rules of shunning verbal pauses and fillers, slangs and unknown technical jargon, in order to speak with clarity, you need to avoid double negatives in your speech and improve your vocabulary — done simply by reading more.

Bumping up your vocabulary allows you to clearly articulate your subject, and you need to show the audience that you are an expert in your subject. This means knowing your subject inside-out as well, no excuses. Moreover, do not neglect your grammar. Sitting in on a presentation with bad grammar is like trying to read a novel with a hyperactive kid running around — you try to concentrate but the distraction becomes too blatant and overwhelming to understand or enjoy the presentation.

Behind Simplicity

Is Complexity

Confusion usually arises due to one of two things: beating around the bush of your point, or saying too much that does not need to be said. In both cases, your audience is going to quite listening and shut down. If you have a complicated process to explain, add gist and simplicity to your explanation. Adding even more complexity is going to confound your audience even more.

You will then need to know what it means to sound articulate and educated — the two do not necessarily go hand in hand. Using flowery language and big words show that you are educated, but this does not mean your audience would understand you — that is solved by being articulate.

It works when trying to persuade as well. The trouble with persuasion is that it sometimes is overdone on the presenter’s part, but the best way to persuade is through clarity. As Dr. Flint McGlaughlin from Marketing Experiments often propounds, “Clarity trumps persuasion.” What better way to win people over than by making them understand exactly what you are talking about? Be consistent with your message, use plain terms and clarify, clarify, clarify the doubts of your audience.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More

Quick Tip1

Clarity is not all about explaining and talking clearly, but a whole process to make your audience feel as it they were the ones who pitched the idea.

Quick Tip2

Sitting in a presentation with bad grammar is like trying to real a novel with a hyperactive kid running around — you try to concentrate but the distraction becomes too blatant and overwhelming to understand or enjoy the presentation.

Quick Tip3

Be consistent with your message, use plain terms and clarify, clarify, clarify the doubts of your audience.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our work- shops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

Your Persuasion Cheat Sheet: How to Convince the other Party 
Winter 2015, Asia Volume 6, Number 11

YOUR PERSUASION CHEAT SHEET: How To Convince The Other Party?
ethos, pathos, logos

Make no mistake about it. When it comes to persuasions, knowing exactly how to persuade the audience is a powerful skill. While none of us are mind-readers, Aristotle got it right by narrowing down the tools of being a convincing speaker to three things: Ethos, Pathos and Logos.

The trio are must-haves in any persuasion that aims to win over the audience. Think Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs and even Barack Obama – take a leaf out of their books. By incorporating ethos, the credibility of the persuader; pathos, the emotional connection to the audience, and logos, your logical argument, you’ll soon be charming your audience just like King, Jobs and Obama.

The Bottom

Line

So what exactly is ethos, pathos and logos and how exactly do you harness their effectiveness? You first need to establish your credibility as a speaker to your audience, and this is your ethos. It is easier to sway the audience to your viewpoints once they have your credentials in mind. This means gaining their respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic. It is not about how well qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Now that you have the audience’s attention, pandar to their emotions. This is pathos. Do your anecdotes evoke any emotional connection with your audience? Are your stories relatable? It helps to do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your anecdotes accordingly.

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument. This is logos. Take care, what may sound logical to you may not be true for your audience. In order to curb this, ensure your argument is backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant! If you have a follow-up action, it has to be not only feasible but within the budgetary standards of your audience as well.

Connecting

The Dots

An obvious answer would be to form long-term bonds with whoever you are negotiating with as this would more likely have areas where you can create value. The longer you negotiate with someone, the better your chances at creating a practice/pattern of value creation.

Another way would be to build your reputation so that word gets around that you are someone who negotiates cooperatively. This might make people more prone to negotiating with you.
Last but not least, an innovative way to turn a single negotiation into an iterative one would be to use the issues on the table to build follow-up negotiations. Instead of laying all the cards on the table at once, break them up into separate issues that can be negotiated separately. There will be too many factors to deal at once, so both parties would have to meet again to further discuss these issues and find a better win-win deal.

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More

Quick Tip1

Gaining your audience’s respect and proving you are a worthy authority on your topic is not about how well-qualified you know you are, but how the audience perceives your qualifications.

Quick Tip2

Do your background research on your audience as then you would know what makes them tick, and plan your ancedots accordingly

Quick Tip3

Last but not least, wrap up your argument or persuasion with a logical and sound argument or viewpoint, backed up by facts and statistics that are relevant.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our work- shops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!

Technology can be Archaic: Why you must never use PowerPoint 
Spring 2016, Asia Volume 6, Number 13

TECHNOLOGY CAN BE ARCHAIC:
Why You Must Never Use PowerPoint
Tried and Tested

Let’s face it. Ever since the invention of PowerPoint, it has become default for many presenters to utilize it. In fact, it has become refreshing not to walk into a presentation that uses PowerPoint! Take Gary Vaynerchuck for example. At an INBOUND marketing conference in 2012, the self-made entrepreneur captivated the audience in a 45-minute presentation that not once used a single PowerPoint slide and earned himself a standing ovation.

If that is not reason enough, a recent survey done by SlideRocket (an alternative to PowerPoint) indicated that at least one out of four would rather forego sex that sit through a presentation. Almost a fifth of the thousand adults polled would rather work on a Saturday. PowerPoint is used not only by entrepreneurs, but teachers as well. An estimated 30 million PowerPoint presentations are made daily, with more than 500 million users worldwide.

With all that in mind, is it any wonder why PowerPoint has become a tried and tested presentation tool?

Pointless?

We think so too

Granted, PowerPoint adds structure to your presentation. But therein lies a problem as well. Presenters get carried away with putting too many bullet points and adding pointless graphics. There are more ways to spice up your presentation, and there is a difference between interesting and distracting graphics.

Be mindful of keeping a balance between the amount of words and visuals. However, while it is helpful having bullet points for all to flow with your verbiage, emphasis is only effective when people hear what you are saying and understand its importance. And most of the time, people fall into the trap of using graphics that do not help the audience retain your message.

Too many

Says too little

Yet another reason why you should not always use PowerPoint is the danger of information overload. By now, you should know that simplicity is key to getting through to your audience — they want only the meat of your message. There is no right amount of slides to use for your presentation thus many run wild with not only the amount of slides but the information on them.

With too many slides come too many words. You will leave your audience struggling to read what is on your slide, and this takes the attention away from what you are saying. Your slides are not there to tell the audience your story; you are the one giving the message and the slides are merely to reinforce what you are saying. Your presentation will start going downhill once the audience stops listening to you. It is advisable instead to allow a few seconds for the audience to take in what is on your slide before resuming your speech.

At the end of the day, PowerPoint is only powerful if done right, and how many can confidently say that they can do that?

60 Seconds

is All it Takes
to Know a Little More

Quick Tip1

While it is helpful having bullet points for all to follow with your verbiage, emphasis is only effective when people hear what you are saying and understand its importance.

Quick Tip2

Yet another reason why you should not always use PowerPoint is the danger of information overload. By now, you should know that simplicity is key to getting through to your audience.

Quick Tip3

Your slides are not there to tell the audience your story; you are the one giving the message and the slides are merely to reinforce what you are saying.

Quick Tip4

Sign up for our workshops and accelerate your performance overnight. Guaranteed!